Review: The Wellbeing Guide to London

wellbeing-guide

Our guest blogger and fave yoga expert Sally Lovett launched her first book at The Wildfood Cafe in Neils Yard earlier this month. We went along to raise a glass of vodka and fresh berries (naturally) and chat to a glowing crowd of London’s wellbeing experts.

As New Year’s Resolutions and detox fever sweep across the country The Wellbeing Guide to London is a must for everybody looking to achieve every day good health and relaxation within the chaos of the UK’s capital.

Wild Food_900

“Increasingly, we Londoners are discovering that we can find our health and happiness right here right now,” says Tessa Watt founder of Slow Down London.

The Wellbeing Guide to London encourages us to do just that through it’s colourful reviews of the best organic eateries, yoga and meditation centres and studios, gyms and pools.

“The sheer abundance and variety of brilliant places featured in the guide… proves that you don’t need to escape to a spa in Thailand to unwind, nourish and revive.” Says Sally.

We couldn’t agree more!

Shoreditch Pilates_900

Priced at a healthy £10 The Wellbeing Guide to London is available to buy online here.

You can keep up to date with Sally’s top tips for wellbeing in the city @Wellbeing_LDN

Advertisements

CTC Launch Women’s Cycling Team

The CTC celebrated the launch of Team CTC, their first women’s cycling team, at The London Bike Show earlier this month.

UiarLg3CmAZxo_ih289DA86d1DnyRrlagvrxIYtSMxY

The team will be made up of six core riders of Elite, Category 1 and 2 status and will offer the opportunity for two guest riders to compete alongside the team in selected races. The team will compete in six overseas high profile UCI races, the National Women’s Individual and Team Road Race series, whilst also taking part in the thrilling Smithfield and Newport nocturnes. Riders on the team will also act as cycling ambassadors, encouraging cycling as part of an active lifestyle by taking part in events and mass participation rides.

Chief Executive of CTC Gordon Seabright said: “We’re hoping that CTC’s support will translate into inspiring more women to take up cycling. Getting women riding for sport or leisure is of course doubly important as women often are the ones encouraging the next generation to cycle, cementing a lasting legacy for women’s cycling in the UK.”

 

yZ1mseyVeROuXrqikllHqM2wjnpkgAMXmnHPNdNcW2Q

Feeling inspired to take your cycling further? Why not join a club yourself. British Cycling has a great online tool which allows you to find clubs across the UK. There are plenty to choose from and clubs such as Kent Velo Girls specialise in women only rides and races to suit all levels. Their ever popular training camp runs for a week from March 18th 2013 and the club organises easy rides every Monday, Faster Fridays and Sunday road rides with Time Trials for the more advanced.

Are you a member of a cycling club? Let us know about it and we’ll feature you and your club here.

Yoga for Cyclists: Back to work & back in the saddle by Stretching the City

Although a lengthy ride and blast of fresh air can be just what we need at this time of year, there’s no denying that getting back on the bike after a few weeks of festive fun can be something of a struggle. Thankfully, our guest blogger and yoga teacher, Sally Lovett from Stretching the City is here to share some yoga tips and poses for pain-free pedalling.
1. Standing forward bend
This pose lengthen out the hamstrings and gently stretches out the lower back, which can get compressed from many miles hunched over the handlebars.
Stand with your feet hip-width apart and with bent knees gently fold over, hinging at the hips. Let your head drop completely, even giving it a gently shake from side to side to release your neck. Let your arms drop and fingertips rest on the floor, or alternatively grab hold of alternate elbows. Take 5 deep breaths, letting the weight of the head draw the upper body closer to the floor with every exhale. If it’s comfortable to do so on your lower back, start to lengthen the backs of the legs, raising the hips up to the ceiling. For an extra release in the lower back, sway gently from side to side with arms outstretched. Roll up super slowly, restacking the spine as you go and come to stand at the front of your mat in ‘mountain pose’.
woman doing stretch exercises
2. Lizard lunge 
Begin by practicing a few standard ‘runners’ lunges before graduating on to lizard lunge to really increase the flexibility and mobility of the hips. A great all-rounder for cyclist’s tight hips, lizard pose stretches the hip flexors, inner thigh and quadriceps.
Come into a lunge with your right leg forward and bent at 90 degrees so that the right knee is tracking over the ankle. Wiggle your right foot to the right and bring both hands on the inside of your right foot. Take an inhale and as you exhale, bend your elbows slightly and start to lower your shoulders – keeping both shoulders in line with oneanother. If it’s available to you, lower on to your elbows and rest your forearms on the floor. Alternatively, stay up on your hands. Hold for 5 breaths and repeat other side.
parsvottonasna4big
3. Cobra
Sustaining the cycling posture of hunching forward over handlebars tightens and compresses the muscles in the back. Maintain flexibility in the spine and open up the chest with this easy back bend.
Lying face down bring your hands underneath your shoulders, so that arms are bent. Lowering your shoulders away from ears and elbows hugging into the ribs, press your hands into the floor and raise your upper body up on an inhale. Slide the shoulders down towards the waist and breathe expansively for 5 breaths using the full capacity of the lungs.
Cobra-Pose
 Sally teaches drop-in vinyasa flow and 6 week beginners yoga courses in Angel on Monday and Wednesday evenings. The next beginners yoga course starts on 14th and 16th January 2012 and has places still available. Visit www.stretchingthecity.com  for more details.